Archery: One of the Safest Recreational Sport… No Really!

safety-firstThere is often a misconception that archery is very dangerous. Although a bow and arrow can be a lethal weapon, archery is actually one of the safest sports because there is a culture of safety. Statistically, archery is one of the safest recreational sports there is with only 0.65 injuries per 1000 participants as outlined in the USA National Electronic Injury Surveillance System and represents the hospitals which actually record the information. Check out the Archery Safety report from Arizona State and Fish Department from 2004.

This is largely because of the culture of safety that encompasses the sport. All coaches start by instructing their students with the fundamentals of archery safety. I remember my first lesson was about safety first. Nowadays, I regularly shoot through my house for practice and we never worry about danger because of the culture of safety within my house. Everyone follows the basic archery safety rules. For archers there are two basic areas of safety that you should maintain, personal safety including equipment and field or range safety.

Personal Safety

  • Always shoot with well maintained equipment and arrows
    • Always inspect your equipment and arrows before shooting
    • Before shooting each arrow inspect the arrow and nock for damage
    • Cracked or bent arrow must never be shot.
  • One should always use a bow-stringer for longbows and recurve bows. This will reduce the possibility of damage to the bow and injury to the person.
  • Shoot with good archery form ensuring you wear proper attire and a properly positioned arm-guard.
  • Never, ever shoot while intoxicated or with anyone who is.

Good Rule of Thumb: If in doubt, stop and get it checked it out.

Field and Range Safety

  • When shooting…
    • Do not shoot with ANYONE in front of the shooting line
    • Do not nock an arrow while anyone is in front of the shooting line
    • Only nock an arrow whwn you are on the shooting line and after the signal to start shooting
    • A loaded bow is only pointed at the assigned target
    • NEVER EVER point an arrow at anyone, whether on a bow or not.
    • Arrow must never be shot straight up into the air
  • When not shooting
    • Pay attention and be respectful of other archers
    • Once finished shooting you must be behind the shooting line and paying attention
  • When retrieving arrows from the target
    • Leave your bow behind the shooting line (hang-up your bow), you will need two free hands to collect your arrows from the target
    • Always walk forward to collect the arrows, never run.
    • Always pick-up arrows on the way first. Whether they yours or not.
    • Always walk up to the side of the target butt, so as to not to accidentally walk into the rear of the arrows lodged in the target.
    • One person at a time should withdraw their arrows from the target.
    • When withdrawing arrows from the target, ensure no-one is standing behind you. Pulling arrows may require a lot of force and they can come out of the target suddenly and could hurt someone standing behind them.
    • When carrying arrows, always hold them to your side with the points down.
    • Make sure that EVERYONE has returned behind the shooting line before starting the next shooting end.

Individual ranges may have additional rules specific to their courses, all ranges will adhere to the basic archery range safety rules. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced professional archer, if we all continue to practice the culture of archery safety we can enjoy the sport for many years to come.

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2012 Midas Riser

Late in 2010, I switched to the Cartel Midas riser and I have been extremely happy with it ever since. In fact, I switched just 6 weeks before winning my spot to the Canada Winter Games. It also was my primary bow for the World Indoor Archery Championship in Las Vegas. As part of the being on Team Canada, I was required to have a duplicate bow for international competitions. So my sponsor, Cartel Doosung sent me the new version for 2012.  Personally, once the indoor season is complete, I will be switching to the new 2012 Midas version as my primary bow.

Like Guy Fieri from Diners, Drive-ins and Dives says “It’s Money” …

The new Cartel 2012 Midas Riser is being produced in cooperation with BowKorea, one of the bright new specialist manufacturers on the highly competitive Korean archery scene. The new 2012 model is available in both 23” and 25” version for both left-handed and right-handed archers and is machined out of AL7001 CNC aluminum. It weighs only 1.14kg for 23” or 1.2 kg for 25” version, and along with the original black, blue, red and silver they have added white and green. Constructed with holes throughout the body for the windiest days and maintains the natural wood handle.

Along with the dual options for your cushion plunger, this year’s model includes a highly detailed clicker extension and the innovative side-to-side adjustable limb pocket system. So now, not only can you adjust the tiller, the new limb pocket system allows you to adjust the actual limb pocket for adaptability to a wide variety of international limb fittings (ILF) limbs.

If you are considering a new riser, check out the new 2012 Cartel Doosung Midas.