Girl Guides

Before I was in archery, before I competed internationally in robotics, I was a Girl Guide. Girl Guides is a parallel movement to Boy Scout for girls in 1909, Robert Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting decided that girls should not be part of Scouts.  Therefore, in 1910 Robert’s wife Agnes started the Girls Guides, named after a famous frontier regiment in the British Indian Army, the Corps of Guides. Guiding makes a positive difference in the life of every girl and woman who experiences Guiding so she can contribute responsibly to her communities.

The Girl Guides of Canada’s goal is to develop confident, courageous and resourceful girls who will make a difference in the world.  Girl Guide values are

  • I Promise to do my best,
  • To be true to myself, my beliefs and Canada
  • I will take action for a better world
  • And respect the Guiding Law

The Guiding Law challenges me to:

  • be honest and trustworthy
  • use my resources wisely
  • respect myself and others
  • recognize and use my talents and abilities
  • protect our common environment
  • live with courage and strength
  • share in the sisterhood of Guiding.

My introduction to Girl Guides at a young age has helped develop me into the person I am today. I started as a Spark, continued through Brownies, until I graduated from Guides at which point I had collected two full badge scarves and the coveted Lady Baden Powell award.

This past weekend, I was invited to a Girl Guide camp to introduce archery to a group of Girl Guides. It was a real trip down memory lane and it was a lot of fun to see young girls enjoying the same experience that I did when I was young. I remember the Saturday afternoon events at camp were always my highlight of the weekend.  This time, it was my turn to make it the best part of the whole day and teach this new group of guides how to shoot a bow and arrow. Everyone loved it, so much so I actually had a little 9 year old girl come up to me and hug me telling me how much she loved it.

To witness someone enjoy the sport and love it as much as you is the best part of being a coach. Being a part of the start of a new dream in another person’s life is so rewarding, and gives you the unwavering desire to do it over and over again.

Without people willing to help develop new dreams in kids, there may not be as many adults with successful dreams.

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Stacey Levitt Women And Sport Memorial Scholarship

I am very pleased to announce I am one of this year’s Stacey Levitt Women And Sport Memorial Scholarship recipients.  It is an honor to be one of this year’s five recipients that include Angel Anderson of Edmonton, Alberta, Sheena Dubyk of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Alannah MacLean of  Sudbury, Ontario and Jenna Spencer, Mount Currie, British Columbia.

With over 500 applicants, this year it is a special honor to even be considered for this prestigious award. Past recipients include Hayley Wickenheiser of Calgary, the University of New Brunswick Red Blazers Women’s Varsity Hockey Team and the Ottawa Banshees Women’s Sports Club.

The Stacey Levitt Women and Sport Scholarship is in memory of a very special 18 year old woman who was struck down by a car while she was jogging on Aug. 30, 1995.

She was a superior athlete, a top student, and loved by many. She participated in sport for the sheer joy of the experience. She loved the camaraderie, the team work, and the competition and she displayed that love in many sports – swimming, scuba diving, tai kwon do, triathlon, gymnastics and jazz. Stacey always strived to be the best she could be, and filled her life with joy and meaning.

The Stacey Levitt Women and Sport Memorial Scholarship, is awarded annually to a young woman, a girls’ team, or a sport organization that exemplify Stacey’s ideals and qualities.

The scholarship is in its sixteenth year of being awarded and as the first archer ever selected, I have a special thanks to Stacey’s parents, Ned and Cheryl Levitt, and the complete selection committee, and promise to continue my efforts to carry on Stacey’s dreams.

“Believe in yourself! You can do whatever you want if you really set your heart to it”  Stacey Levitt Poem, 1989, Age 12