The 12 Days of Christmas… Archery Version

My archery version of the 12 days of Christmas ( same music … )

ChristmasOn the first day of Christmas, my true love sent to me an arrow lost in a tree.

On the second day of Christmas, my true love sent to me Two National records, And an arrow lost in a tree.

On the third day of Christmas, my true love sent to me Three Bulls eyes, Two National records, And an arrow lost in a tree.

On the fourth day of Christmas, my true love sent to me Four Compound Shooters, Three Bulls eyes, Two National records, And an arrow lost in a tree.

On the fifth day of Christmas, my true love sent to me Five FITA Stars, Four Compound Shooters, Three Bulls eyes, Two National records, And an arrow lost in a tree.

On the sixth day of Christmas,my true love sent to me Six Make-up arrows, Five FITA Stars, Four Compound Shooters, Three Bulls eyes, Two National records, And an arrow lost in a tree.

On the seventh day of Christmas, my true love sent to me Seven Cracked Nocks, Six Make-up arrows, Five FITA Stars, Four Compound Shooters, Three Bulls eyes, Two National records, And an arrow lost in a tree.

On the eighth day of Christmas, my true love sent to me Eight Lost Fletchings, Seven Cracked Nocks, Six Make-up arrows, Five FITA Stars, Four Compound Shooters, Three Bulls eyes, Two National records, And an arrow lost in a tree.

On the ninth day of Christmas, my true love sent to me Nine Recurve Shooters, Eight Lost Fletchings, Seven Cracked Nocks, Six Make-up arrows, Five FITA Stars, Four Compound Shooters, Three Bulls eyes, Two National records, And an arrow lost in a tree.

On the tenth day of Christmas, my true love sent to me Ten Perfect ends, Nine Recurve Shooters, Eight Lost Fletchings, Seven Cracked Nocks, Six Make-up arrows, Five FITA Stars, Four Compound Shooters, Three Bulls eyes, Two National records, And an arrow lost in a tree.

On the eleventh day of Christmas, my true love sent to me Eleven Target Butts, Ten Perfect ends, Nine Recurve Shooters, Eight Lost Fletchings, Seven Cracked Nocks, Six Make-up arrows, Five FITA Stars, Four Compound Shooters, Three Bulls eyes, Two National records, And an arrow lost in a tree.

On the twelfth day of Christmas, my true love sent to me Twelve Carbon Fiber Arrows, Eleven Target Butts, Ten Perfect ends, Nine Recurve Shooters, Eight Lost Fletchings, Seven Cracked Nocks, Six Make-up arrows, Five FITA Stars, Four Compound Shooters,
Three Bulls eyes, Two National records, And an arrow lost in a tree!

Merry Christmas to everyone!

MK Archery Vera Limbs

Every bow requires limbs, most beginner, and some intermediate bow kits come with limbs. If an archer moves towards competition archery, they will want to upgrade this essential element. Designers of limbs strive for an ideal combination of speed, stability and smoothness when deciding what materials to use and how to combine them.

Modern recurve limbs are made from multiple layers including fiberglass, carbon and/or wood and usually are laminated over a core of wood or carbon foam. A good archer will be able to shoot well with any good set of limbs, no matter the composition and elite archers often have a selection of various types for different training purposes, they usually gravitate towards one.

Foam-core limbs are more resistant to warping, are usually lighter and are not affected by humidity and/or weather conditions. They provide a consistent straight smooth pull curve and a faster shot. Carbon foam-core limbs are usually a lot more expensive and require a lot care. Archers need to inspect and repair even minor imperfections as they can lead to massive failure. Whereas, Wood-Core Limbs are usually far less expensive than foam-core, and are usually more durable. Although they usually have, a little more mass weight they can deliver a slightly higher speed with the same poundage as foam-core limbs.

Manufacturers produce limbs in various strengths or draw weights to service all types of archers and are measured in poundage (#) at a certain draw length (usually twenty-eight inches) and by length of risers.

Example is 66”-34# @ 28” or 68”- 32#@28”

Since not all archers have the same draw length, the same limbs will be different for each archer. The same set of 34# limbs for an archer with a 24” draw length will pull less than 34# and an archer with a greater than 28” draw will pull more than 34#. You can easily determine your draw weight using a bowscale at your local archery shop.

Limbs also come in various lengths that will determine the overall length of the bow which may be a factor for shorter archers.  This chart can help you determine which length to order.

Riser Size Long Limbs Medium Limbs Short Limbs
23” 68” 66” 64”
25” 70” 68” 66”

Limbs use to be designed specifically for the manufacturers riser and once you purchased a riser you were bound to that manufacturer for limbs or you would have to change both limbs and riser. Now most manufacturers use International Limb Fittings or ILF and are an unofficial standard that allow limbs manufactured by different companies to fit on the various risers.

There are several great manufacturers of limbs and in 2010 MK Archery started producing a great set of competition limbs.  Currently holding world records in recurve men with scores of 1386 for FITA and 342 for 90M. The two top of the line models are the MK 1440 (foam-core) and VERA (wood-core).  The limbs are made from multiple crossed carbon layers, laminated over a foam or wood core. If you are seriously considering investing in a good set of limbs, consider some from MK Archery.

Arrows

One of the ongoing costs for archers is arrows, this is especially true for young archers that are still growing, and their draw length is constantly changing. Once an arrow has been cut and sized, you can only make so many adjustments to a clicker before you will outgrow the arrow length and need to purchase new ones.

One of the biggest questions for competition archers is what type of arrows should I use and what will give me the best performance for how much I can afford.

Historically, this was easy since there were only wooden arrows, however nowadays there are real choices, aluminum or carbon fiber.  Aluminum shafts have been  steadily replaced wooden arrows since their introduction in 1939 however in the 1980’s, carbon fiber shafts were developed as the new technology to challenge aluminum shafts.

Which one should you use? There are no easy answers; it is a personal preferences and both have advantages and disadvantages. There are four key areas to examine; durability, flexibility, diameter and price point.

Durability

Aluminum arrows can be bent easily as they collide with obstructions, other arrows and the target itself. Sometimes, bends can be repaired however; the shaft is weakened and more likely to bend again in the same spot.

Carbon fiber arrows remain straight as the day you buy them until they break. If a carbon fiber is damaged it can be extremely dangerous to shoot with and will need to be replace immediately.

As far as durability is concerned, carbon fiber arrows have the biggest advantage.

Flexibility

Aluminum Arrows are more likely to sustain damage from impact because the shafts are rigid.

Carbon arrows resist damage because they are more flexible. They easily adsorb the energy vibrations transferred during impact of the target.

For consistently accurate competition archers, carbon fiber arrows have the advantage. For beginners this is not a real factor.

Diameter

The diameter of an arrow is very important for shooting outside. The larger the arrow the greater the wind effects the arrow, this is called wind drift. Younger archers with shorter draw length can achieve greater distances be more accurate with thinner arrows.  Although aluminum arrows traditionally have a wide range of sizes available thinner diameters can be achieved with carbon fiber because they are lighter.

In my opinion, this is a draw and it depends on the archers requirements.

Price Point

Obviously, this is the most important factor for a young archer, since it depends on your budget. Aluminum arrows are usually more inexpensive and therefore more widely used by young archers. However, the cost of carbon fiber arrows are dropping, such as the new Cartel Triple Arrows which are often compared to Easton’s A/C/E’s in quality however are more affordable.

If you are interested in purchasing arrows, you need to select the appropriate arrows for your draw length and bow poundage. Having arrows that are too rigid or too flexible will yield inconsistent and unexpected results.

Most manufacturers provide a chart to help archers select the correct arrows. For target archers you need to consider the poundage you actually draw and not just the overall limbs poundage. For Cartel Triples (Carbon Fiber) or Cartel X-pert (Aluminum) arrows check out the following selection chart for recommended Cartel Triple and Cartel X-PERT size selections.

Cartel Recurve Arrow Selection Chart

Top number = Cartel Triple & bottom number = Cartel X-pert

Draw 

Weight

Draw Length

23″

24″

25″ 26″ 27″ 28″ 29″ 30″ 31″
23-29 1200 1100 1100 1100
1040
1000
980
900
900
800
820
700
740
600
30-35 1200 1100 1100
1040
1000
980
900
900
800
820
700
740
600
660
500
580
35-40 1200 1100
1040
1000
980
900
900
800
820
700
740
600
660
500
580
400
520
40-45 1000
1040
1000
980
900
900
800
820
700
740
600
660
500
580
400
520
400
45-50 1000
980
900
900
800
820
700
740
600
660
500
580
400
520
400 300
50-55 900
900
800
820
700
740
600
660
500
580
500
520
400 300 300
55-60 800
820
700
740
600
660
600
580
500
520
500 400 300 300